Sky Ladder

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“Fireworks?” I thought “What does that have to do with me” as my mind prepared to dismiss watching the recently recommended program. “Ah well, I’ll watch it because…”, I like to take people seriously.

From the start, I knew I would finish it, my heart was gripped. I’ve never been so inspired by anything this otherworldly. I have so much emotion thinking about it, this documentary has sparked something deep inside, I’ve recommended it to all those I believed would care and now to all of you, watch it on Netflix!

It has it all; passion, vision, bureaucracy, family, love, humanity. It touched me on a deep deep level, words cannot even express. Some of the works made me think of heaven. of Jesus coming on the clouds, the beauty of God’s work in the world and so many other themes.

Tears, it would be hard to watch it again without tears but I will, I have to. I know there will be something else to unwrap and marvel in. I would like to meet Cai Guo-Qiang one day. For now, I find comfort in viewing his works. “Fireworks?” “Yes!” hahaha “Oh yes”

Enjoy xx.

Designer, Design Thyself

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This was a completely different post when I started writing a week ago. I wanted to critique the Design and Exclusion conference that I attended. Talking about inclusion, exclusion, diversity etc is tough because the attempt to include every single point of view in every single space is futile. However a discussion was started which should be commended. Even though I felt excluded in some areas of the conversation, I trust that design doesn’t give up, (I discovered someone also!), so I look forward to a better conference next time.

As the ideas and words for the critique percolated in my head, I came across Ayse Birsel’s book, Design the Life You Love and it was exactly what I’d been thinking, but now on an individual level. We have with us a powerful tool, design, that can bring about positive change even in our own lives and that’s what this book seeks to help us to do.

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Basically, while we attempt to design the world around us, we should not neglect ourselves and our lives. Being able to stop and assess what is, ‘deconstruction’, as Ayse calls it, is the important first phase of the process. This also fits well with the Appraisal theory and to an extent, mindfulness, but it also provides the tools to help in the ‘reconstruction’ process.

“Deconstructing and breaking current reality is necessary to enable us to shift our perspective to see the same things differently in order to reconstruct a new reality that is more than the sum of it’s parts “

I got my copy a few days ago, and I’m excited about going over it. I need it so much in my life right now as I deal with so many moving parts, and I don’t want to lose the ability to see myself in relation with others (partly why I decided not to go ahead with the critique, I needed to take care of the plank in my own eyes).

This is not just for professional designers, it’s for anyone ready to take a step to becoming a better person and having a life where you love and love.

user you

Enjoy.

 

Emotional Sensitivity is a business asset

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Every business wants to achieve flow. A state of high quality productivity that is effective and efficient. However, every business is made up of people, who get things done, this is where emotional sensitivity comes in. Continue reading

Gratitude-Thinking: A business approach?

Thanks-Thinking, that’s what I was going to call it, that’s how it was told to me in my dream and then I read the etymology of ‘Thanks’ On second thoughts, maybe that’s not too bad. Think-Thinking Continue reading

The Stuff of Designers: Resilience

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The Apprentice is one of my favourite things to watch. I was a latecomer to the series, so I binge watched the previous 7 and was hooked. Although I think the current season (12) has some of the poorest candidates, I am still fascinated by watching different types of people come together to create things.

The last episode (7) ‘Boat Show’ was especially great because while I watch these things for entertainment my mind constantly searches for something to learn from it. Resilience means 3 main things and I think this episode illustrated it well.

Grow and thrive in the face of challenges

The task was to sell some luxury and cheap items, both teams wanted to sell Jet-Skis not Speedboats. So when one team, Nebula, lost out on the opportunity to sell the Jet-Ski, it was a big challenge. They also had to battle the weather which is the worst I’ve seen on this show.

Bounce back from adversity

So Nebula weren’t given the opportunity to sell the Jet-skis, and it seemed like a big setback. One of the team members was sullen and took it personally. The project manager made sure to communicate to the team that this situation should not affect the way they sold the other items. Her positive attitude motivated the team.

Bounce forward when there’s opportunity

When they got to the boardroom, I was whooping like I’d never done before, this was an amazing show of resilience because the team that suffered the setback went on to win by an immense margin. They decided to look at the opportunity that lay in the speedboats, and sold it like it was always their number one choice.

Life will not always give us what we want, but with an attitude that says, “I will look for and appreciate the opportunity that’s right in front of me” you can be sure to get very far.

Designers especially need to have this attitude, because design itself is a challenge. The first iteration might fail, it’s resilience that allows one to step forward again for another iteration, which makes design what it is.

My favorite movie about Resilience remains Will Smith’s Pursuit of Happyness. The first time I watched it, I cried for maybe 30mins afterward. You have to love the human spirit, and it’s one each and everyone of us has.

Resilience is a skill that anyone can learn, so lets all remember to have a positive, grateful attitude towards life.

Empathy Building: Mental Health Cafe

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A thing I created while swapping feelings & stories on my first day. Guess what it is 😀

“These are the final 12” She said to me pointing at her phone. I was eating lunch and I couldn’t even imagine what she meant. “Final 12 of?” I continued “Xfactor!”, she exclaimed, “final 12 on Xfactor” Oh, I went, it was only my first day at the mental health cafe. She went on to describe the contestants in detail while I asked for pictures. In the cafe, she was just another person with a particular way of communicating and the added skill of describing things in great detail, straight from memory, in the outside world she would be labelled as “handicapped”

This year has been the toughest year of my life and with suffering, it’s easy for us to disappear into ourselves. Imagine how many other people are going through the same or much worse, we end up with a society where hearts are blocked off from each other.

When I got back to London, after many days of rolling in the dark, I resolved that one of the best ways to get myself out of darkness was to reach out to others. Luckily at the same time I had been introduced to a project by a man whom I’d met and helped earlier in the year.

This project is helping people cope with some mental health challenges. While I was researching around how to connect with more people with these difficulties, I met another man who introduced me to the Dragon Cafe, a pop up mental health cafe, that opens up every Monday in Borough. I was so happy.

“The whole point, is to be a complete antithesis to your average mental health service. People like it, because there’s no pressure to do anything at all. They can sing, if they want to. They can write. They can paint. But they can also just collapse on a bean bag and snore”.

The first day was amazing. Over the course of my volunteering I came to see how many were regulars, why they come to the cafe, how it relaxes them and the friends they make. Every single person in the cafe both volunteers and guests have/had mental health challenges so it makes it easier to talk to people. I work at the art table and I get to see how much being able to ‘play’ makes people happy, free and connected.

As a UX practitioner, it was a no brainer to be amongst those I would be designing for, even though I face mental health challenges myself. As a human, I knew it made sense to be able to connect with others, to come out of oneself. For me, going there helps to build my empathy for others, to understand other perspectives like the lady I had an interesting conversation with about Xfactor,  not to be too hard on myself, to accept orders from others, to co operate with people (we pack up the cafe at night)

A wonderful announcement was made yesterday, some people from PWC will be creating a similar pop up in the City. The cafe makes so much sense and my hope is many more such cafes are created, if you aren’t too busy why not pay a visit or donate to the cause.

Cheerios xo

Talk, but I’ll need pen and paper.

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We used chalkboards when I was in primary school and it was fun. Our teacher would ask someone to write his notes on the board so that the rest of the class could copy. Though it wasn’t the prettiest thing to do, chalk on my head, chalk on my school uniform, I would volunteer. I not only wanted to show off my handwriting but genuinely enjoyed the process of putting down and together, words.

Continue reading